Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Contact & Special Assistance Form

In the event of an emergency or if you require special assistance due to a disability or impairment, we ask all students, staff and faculty to please fill out the form on the link above, so our Safety Support Services team is prepared accordingly. All information provided is considered confidential and will be used solely for emergency purposes. Completing this form is voluntary.

Below you will find the TKU Emergency Preparation Guide information.

To contact our Security Desk at the TKU front entrance call 817-552-7353 or for more information please email safetysupportservices@tku.edu.

What is an Emergency?

Why should you care about emergencies?
An emergency is an event that threatens the lives, property, and/or operations of people and business.  Some emergencies are predictable, while others occur without any warning.

During emergencies, various services may be disrupted for an extended period of time For example, electricity needed to run elevators may be unavailable; communication systems, such as cell phone towers, may be down; and businesses that supply you with food, water, and other needed supplies may be closed.

Tragically, the past decade has seen a number of emergencies occur at college and university campuses across the nation.

What type of emergencies could occur at TKU?
TKU is exposed to many of the same hazards that caused these emergencies. Some examples include:

  • Building Fires
  • Flooding
  • Campus Violence
  • Tornadoes
  • Communicable disease outbreak
  • Winter storms

What is the purpose of this guide?
The Emergency Preparedness Guide was developed by the TKU Safety Support Services Department to prepare you for emergency situations.  The guide contains information on

  • Programs and initiatives TKU is undertaking to ensure the safety and security of the campus community
  • Actions you can take right now to prepare for emergencies
  • Actions you should take during an emergency to protect your life and the lives of those around you

As you read, be sure to view the additional resources noted with each topic as they contain a great deal of helpful information.

If you have any questions regarding the material presented here, you may reach TKU Safety Support Services by emailing safetysupportservices@tku.edu.

What is TKU Doing to Prepare for Emergencies?

TKU Security

TKU uses our own security-contracted guards for primary security on campus. TKU will utilize the Southlake Police Department for law enforcement response to emergencies occurring on the Southlake campus. Security officers are on campus anytime there are students or student activities happening on the campus. The security guards may call upon any of the following organizations to assist in responding to an emergency:

  • Southlake Fire Department, EMS and Police

Emergency Planning

TKU develops emergency plans, such as the TKU Emergency Management Plan, to describe how TKU administrators, security guards, Southlake Police Department, and other response agencies will work together to manage emergencies that occur on the TKU Southlake campus. Continuity of operations plans are developed by individual departments to identify the information and resources each department will need to resume operations following an emergency. The Emergency Preparedness Guide gives guidance to students, faculty, and staff on the actions they should take during an emergency that help to protect themselves and those around them.

Safety Groups on Campus

TKU utilizes a number of groups, teams and committees to support campus safety efforts.

Safety Support Services

The TKU Safety Support Services is the primary contact group in the event of an emergency or information that needs to be communicated. Safety Support Services is the umbrella that will support all other departments, groups, and teams during an emergency.

Authorized Safety Support Services Personnel:

  1. TKU Operations Department
  2. TKU Security

Emergency Management Advisory Committee

The Emergency Management Advisory Committee is charged with reviewing and evaluating emergency planning documents, such as the TKU Emergency Management Plan. The committee helps shape emergency planning efforts by providing feedback on initiatives undertaken by emergency management staff and recommending emergency plans to the Vice President of Operations and Support Services for implementation.

Safety Steering Committee

The charge of the Safety Steering Committee is to review all parking, transportation, risk management, and environmental health and safety issues brought to its attention and suggest remediation actions. The committee also disseminates environmental health and safety reports; injury, illness, and accident data; and recommendations for mitigating related risks.

 

Health Crisis Team

The Health Crisis Team meets in response to reports of a health crisis or disease, which has the potential to affect the TKU campus community. Efforts are focused on gathering information on the situation, managing the dissemination of information to the public, and determining the appropriate preventative actions to take.

 

Safety Captains

Safety Captains are full-time members who have received training to assist their fellow building occupants during emergencies. In order to qualify, you must spend the majority of the day working in the building. Training for Safety Captains will include but not limited to AED and CPR.

 

Staff and Faculty Roles

  • Every member of the university community shall be familiar with the TKU Emergency Plan and understand his or her role in these emergency situations.
  • University faculty members and teaching staff are responsible for the orientation of emergency procedures and evacuation routes to the students at the beginning of each semester. This includes pointing out their specific classroom’s building emergency evacuation routes and exit doors. Remember that the nearest exit routes may not be the same as the as the way they typically enter buildings.

 

Classroom Instruction

To implement policy and/or the lockdown procedures and reinforce building evacuation procedures, each faculty member shall provide the following information and instructions to students:

  • Occupants of The King’s University Southlake campus are required to evacuate building when a fire alarm is activated or an official announcement is given.
  • Evacuation procedures require orderly exiting and assembly outside.
  • Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of each classroom you may occupy. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when entering the building.
  • Students requiring assistance in evacuation shall inform their instructor in writing during the first week of class.
  • During an evacuation – follow the instructions of faculty or class instructors.
  • Do not re-enter a building unless given instructions by the following: Southlake Fire Department, The Southlake Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services.

Shelter-in-Place

“Shelter-in-place” is a directive to seek immediate shelter indoors following the announcement of an emergency condition. Sheltering can be related to a variety of situations, including: severe weather emergencies, hazardous condition, chemical release or criminal activity.

Lockdown

The directive “lockdown” is used to stop access and/or egress as appropriate, to all or a portion of the building.

Building and Classroom Evacuation

All occupants of TKU Southlake campus are required to evacuate the building when a fire alarm and/or an official announcement is made indicating a potentially dangerous situation within the building.

Restricted Access (Vehicle or Building or Area)

An announcement of Restricted Access in reference to a specific building or an area of the campus requires TKU Security and other law enforcement agencies to stop entry of pedestrians or vehicles into that area.

Campus Closed

When “campus closed” is announced, only those employees identified as essential will remain on campus. All other faculty, staff, and students will depart campus. No one should return until a return procedure is announced. Continue to monitor our website for updates.

Campus Restricted Area Alert

The Campus Safety Support Services Office will announce to the campus the area covered by any and all campus alerts and restrictions. Announcement will also be posted to our website.

Drills and Exercises

TKU will conduct periodic drills and exercise to test the effectiveness of emergency response and evacuation procedures. Campus leadership participates in exercises to prepare them for decision-making during an emergency.

Some Helpful Information for You to Prepare for Personal Emergencies

Make a plan

Some emergencies have a recognizable build-up period in which preparedness actions can be taken, but many do not. Plan for emergencies now by:

  • Talking with your friends, family, and co-workers about the actions you will take during an emergency
  • Ensuring you know the evacuation routes and severe weather shelter areas for the buildings in which you spend the majority of your day
  • Identifying where you will go if you need to evacuate the Southlake area suddenly
  • Determining how you will contact friends and family if phones are temporarily unavailable
  • Knowing the location of an learning to use emergency equipment, such as fire extinguishers, evacuation chairs, and automated external defibrillators (AED’s)

Prepare an emergency supply kit

During or immediately following an emergency, you may be on your own for hours or days before emergency responders can reach you. Stashing away a few key items in an emergency supply kit can help you survive during this period of time. When putting together your emergency kit, consider the following items:

  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Copies of important
  • Moist towelettes
  • Documents
  • Toiletries
  • Non-perishable food
  • Cash
  • Change of clothes
  • One gallon of water per person, per day
  • Prescription medications

Be informed

It is important to learn about the hazards you are exposed to by living in North Central Texas and the recommended actions to take during emergencies, such as fires, severe weather, and hazardous material spills.

Receiving training that will be useful for protecting yourself and those around you during emergencies is also important. Al members of the University community are encouraged to participate in and receive training.

You also can serve your community and learn more about how to cope with emergencies by joining a volunteer organization. Southlake has a wide variety of volunteer organizations active in disasters, including the American Red Cross, Medical Reserve Corps, and the Community emergency Response Team.

Where can you find additional information?

For additional information about preparing for emergencies and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • Visit the Ready America emergency preparedness website here.
  • Visit the KnoWhat2Do emergency preparedness website, which is geared toward hazards in North Central Texas, here.
What Can People with Special Needs do to Prepare for Emergencies?

Students who require assistance in evacuation and emergency situations need to inform their instructors in writing during the first week of class.

Who are people with special needs?

Emergencies present unique challenges for people with special needs. People with special needs includes any person who may require assistance during an emergency. This population includes not only those individuals with a visible disability, but also people whose conditions are not immediately apparent and people who are temporarily impaired, such as pregnant women or someone with a sprained ankle.

What is a Personal Support Network?

One of the primary actions people with special needs can take to prepare for emergencies is to develop a Personal Support Network.

A Personal Support Network is a group of individuals you will rely on to assist you during emergency situation, for example, by helping you to evacuate a building during a fire. In order to ensure you have adequate coverage, identify a minimum of three individuals in each building in which you spend a significant portion of each day.

So that your Personal Support Network is best able to assist you, you should ensure that you have explained to them in advance the type of assistance you will need. For example, teach your Personal Support Network how to operate any equipment you use, such as the steps required to disengage the gears of a power wheelchair.

Practice often with your Personal Support Network so they are comfortable and competent performing the actions needed to assist you. You may even need to be rescued by emergency responders. Remember: you know your abilities and limitations and the best way that someone can assist you or ways in which you can assist them. Make sure you are able to quickly and adequately communicate these instructions to your Personal Support Network, good Samaritans and emergency responders.

How Will You Find Out If an Emergency Has Occurred?

Emergency Notification Systems

There are a number of notification systems used by TKU and the City of Southlake to help you to find out if an emergency has occurred or may occur in the near future. If a situation presents an immediate threat to lives, safety, or security of the campus population, emergency notification will be sent to the campus community through a variety of methods.

The King’s Alert

The King’s alert is a mass notification system utilized by TKU to quickly send information about emergency situations to the University community. This information may be communicated via text messaging, emails, or social media.

An alert is used for critical situations, such as campus closings due to inclement weather or health and public safety emergencies.

Outdoor Warning Sirens

To warn residents of approaching severe weather, the City of Southlake has positioned sirens around the city. The purpose of these sirens is to direct residents and businesses to go indoors (residents may not hear the sirens if they are already indoors). When you hear the sirens, go inside and listen to 162.550 megahertz VHF-FM radio for more information.

There is a weekly warning siren test performed Wednesdays at 1:00 pm.

What Are Your Responsibilities During an Emergency?

Safety Support Services

TKU Safety Support Services has been designated to work with Southlake PD, facilities, and other emergency personnel to identify and help resolve facilities and other safety-related issues. These representatives also serve as a point of contact during drills or actual emergencies and relay information between Safety Captains and emergency personnel.

Safety Captains

Safety Captains are full-time members who have received training to assist their fellow building occupants during emergencies. In order to qualify, you must spend the majority of the day working in the building.

Each Safety Captains should be responsible for one area. Collectively, the Safety Captains will work together to accomplish the responsibilities listed below.

Responsibilities

  • Attend Safety Captain Orientation
  • Coordinate regularly with other safety captains in your building
  • Become familiar with emergency procedures as specified in this guide
  • Become familiar with the location and use of safety equipment in the building, such as fire extinguishers and automated external defibrillators (AED)
  • Ensure that all occupants of the building have, depending on the situation, exited the building or gathered at the designated shelter area during drills and actual emergencies
  • Assist individuals with special needs as necessary during drills and actual emergencies

All Other Building Occupants

Building occupants include anyone who spends any portion of the day at the TKU Southlake facility.

Responsibilities

  • Become familiar with the procedures for specific emergencies as outlined in this guide.
  • Follow emergency guidance provided by first responders and safety captains.
What Should You Do If You Witness concerning Behavior?

What is concerning behavior?

Concerning behavior is conduct that would suggest that a person is at risk of harming themselves or others. While all individuals feel upset or distressed at times, the following behaviors may suggest that the problems are more than the “normal” ones:

  • Acting withdrawn from friends and/or family
  • Suspiciousness or irrational behavior
  • Highly disturbed behavior feelings of persecution
  • Outbursts of anger
  • Statements related to death, dying, or feelings of hopelessness
  • Inability to communicate clearly
  • Irrational conversation or speech
  • Loss of contact with reality
  • Threats of harming self or harming others

What Should You Do?

If you witness anyone exhibiting concerning behavior, you should contact the Security Desk. Be prepared to provide the name of the person if known and a brief narrative of his/her behavior. You may contact someone at the Security Desk at the front entrance or by calling 817-552-7353. You can also email Safety Support Services at safetysupportservices@tku.edu with this information. For staff and faculty who witness another member of the staff or faculty exhibiting concerning behavior, notify the appropriate oversight.

What should you expect?

In some situations, you may be contacted by Safety Support Services to verify the behavior that you witnessed.

What Should You Do in the Event of Campus Violence?

What is campus violence?
Campus violence is defined here as encompassing any action(s) threatened or taken by an individual(s) with the intent of killing or inflicting serious bodily harm to others.  An example is a person wielding a weapon.  The perpetrator may be any individual from inside or outside the University community.  The target of the violence may be a specific individual or group or may be randomly selected.

What should you expect and what you should do?
You can expect Safety Coordinators will:

  • Maintain logs of actions taken during emergencies and associated timelines during the event.
  • Monitor their mobile device for additional information.
  • Notify occupants of the building that the building is now in a “lockdown” status per the TKU Emergency Management Plan.
  • Secure all main entrance doors, if safe (no harmful activity in your building).  Note:  Safety Coordinators and their designates will work together on this.
  • Position one safety coordinator at main lobby doors (again, if safe).  This representative will use their judgment to grant access to the building to persons they deem are non-threatening.  NOTE:  If a threatening person moves toward the door, all will seek immediate shelter.
  • Notify the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at 512-232-7986. Inform them that their facility has been manually locked down.

Should you discover that there is a violent or potentially violent person in your building or area, take the following steps:

  • FIRST AND FOREMOST, DO NOT CONFRONT THE PERSON UNLESS THERE IS NO OTHER OPTION TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.
  • Follow the 5 OUTS.
  1. Get OUT OF THE FACILITY, if possible.
  2. Call OUT:  Use mobile phones or other devices only to contact law enforcement personnel with emergency information.
    • Call 911 first or as soon as possible and provide as much information as possible to the police including:
      • The location of the suspect – including building location, floor, and room if possible.
      • Description of suspect – including name (if known), gender, race, height, hair color, clothing description, weapons seen or indicated, what they said, did they indicate a specific target, direction of travel if they have left, and other information the operator requests.
      • Any hazardous materials that may be present in the building, if known.
      • Request an ambulance for anyone who is injured.
  1. KEEP OUT:
    • Do not lock exterior doors.
    • Close interior doors.  Lock doors if possible.
    • Barricade the doors.
  2. HIDE OUT:
    • Seek shelter in the nearest secured place (i.e. classroom or office).
    • If the lights in the room can be turned off – turn them off.
    • Turn off computers, silence mobile phones, radios, or any device that may indicate the room is occupied.
    • If you are on the first floor, close any blinds or curtains on windows.
    • Stay away from doors and try to keep out of the line of sight of windows.
    • Sit or lie on the floor or crouch behind or under desks.  Be as invisible as possible.
    • BE QUIET.
    • DO NOT respond to anyone at the door while you are in lockdown mode.  Law enforcement ill announce themselves.  Verify if possible.  They will release anyone in that room when it is safe.
    • Updated information may be delivered over the Public Address (PA) System, when appropriate.
    • If you are directed to leave your secured area by police, do so as quickly and quietly as possible and follow their specific directions.  Assist those who may require help moving.
    • Should the fire alarm be activated during a lockdown, with for direction on the PA System or from the police before evacuating the building if there is no immediate danger.  If there is smoke or fire present, you may need to evacuate.  Ensure it is as safe as possible before attempting to evacuate.
    • USE MOBILE PHONES ONLY TO NOTIFY LAW ENFORCEMENT OF EMERGENCY INFORMATION.  Mobile phones may interfere with emergency communications.  Police, fire and ambulance radio systems can be negatively impacted by high mobile phone volume.  The only exception to the above is in the event of a medical emergency in your immediate area, or if you have information specific to the current threat.
  3. TAKE OUT:  Last resort.  Use anything to distract or disable the suspect.
  • Notify your co-workers and others in the area of the situation using any means possible (i.e. tell them directly, PA System, telephone, runners, emails, texts, etc.)
  • Lock exterior doors when the alert is given, if possible.  Operation of the doors has no clear cut answer.  In other words, judgment by building occupants and leadership is needed to admit or deny entrance to the building.

If the threat is outside your building:

  • If the doors are not electronic and it is safe to the exterior doors, lock them.
  • If safe, leave a person at the door to let others (non-threatening) coming from outside into the building.
  • Close interior doors.  Lock doors if possible.  Barricade the doors.
  • If the lights in the room can be turned off – turn them off; turn off computers, silence mobile phones, radios, or any device that may indicate the room is occupied.
  • Use mobile phones only to notify law enforcement of critical information.
  • If on the first floor, close any blinds or curtains on windows.
  • Stay away from doors and try to keep out of the line of sight of windows.
  • Sit or lie on the floor or crouch behind or under desks.  Be as invisible as possible.
  • BE QUIET.
  • DO NOT respond to anyone at the door while you are in lockdown mode.  Law enforcement will announce themselves prior to unlocking any door.
  • Confirm if possible.  They will release anyone in that room when it is safe.  Updated information may be delivered over the PA System, when appropriate.
  • If you are directed to leave your secured area by police, do so as quickly and quietly as possible and follow their specific directions.  Assist those who may require help moving.
  • Should the fire alarm be activated during a lockdown, wait for direction on the PA System or from the police before evacuating the building if there is no immediate danger.  If there is smoke or fire present, you may need to evacuate.  Ensure it is as safe as possible before attempting to evacuate.
  • USE MOBILE PHONES ONLY TO NOTIFY LAW ENFORCEMENT OF EMERGENCY INFORMATION.  Mobile phones may interfere with emergency communications.  Police, fire and ambulance radio systems can be negatively impacted by high mobile phone volume.  The only exception to the above is in the event of a medical emergency in your immediate area, or if you have information specific to the current threat.

If you are outside the building when a lockdown is initiated:

  • DO NOT ENTER THE BUILDING
  • Move as far away as possible from the building under lockdown.
  • Await further direction from law enforcement personnel.
  • Otherwise, go to a safe area away from the scene.
  • Check the university’s website and university social media sites for updates and further information as it becomes available.
  • DO NOT CALL THE LOCATION THAT IS IN LOCKDOWN.
  • Do not call anyone inside the building that is in lockdown as it may endanger them.
  • Information updates will be provided by police and university officials as soon as possible and safe to do so.
  • If you are advised by another person in your area, or by law enforcement, that there is a violent or potentially violent person in your area, follow the above steps.
  • DO NOT LEAVE YOUR SAFE AREA until the police have opened the door with a master key to release you from your safe area.

Where can you find additional information?
For additional information about campus violence and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • View the Active Shooter booklet developed by the Department of Homeland Security available here.

 

What Should You Do in the Event of a Building Fire?

What is a building fire?

Building fires can occur as a result of unsafe practices, mechanical failure, or external conditions, such as lightning striking a building. All building fires have the potential to injure or kill anyone in the vicinity and can cause extensive property damage. The dangers from fire are not only the result of visible flames, but are also due to extremely hot temperatures, smoke, and toxic gases.

What should you do?

If you get caught in a fire situation, take the following actions:

  • Evacuate the facility upon hearing the alarm or by an official announcement and follow the TKU Emergency Management Plan.
  • Use designated corridors and fire exit stairs that lead to ground level.
  • Leave the building in an orderly manner.
  • Do not use elevators.
  • Assemble in designated areas per the TKU Emergency Plan.
  • Follow instructions of fire personnel and other first responders.
  • Upon reaching the ground level, stay at least 300 feet (1block) from the building.
  • Report to emergency responders any individuals left in the building.
  • Do not re-enter the building until an “All Clear” is given by emergency officials.

What should you expect?

Once notified of the situation, emergency response personnel will begin arriving on scene. The Southlake Fire and Police Departments will assess the situation and set up a perimeter around the facility. The Southlake Fire Department will extinguish the fire and search the building for persons in need of assistance.

Where can you find additional information?

For additional information about building fires and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • Visit the U.S. Fire Administration website here.
What Should You Do in the Event of a Tornado?

What is a tornado?

A tornado is a destructive wind event, often coinciding with a strong thunderstorm. Tornadoes are described in terms of their wind speed with the most powerful storms achieving 3-second gusts of over 200 miles per hour.

In advance of approaching storms, the National Weather Service issues severe weather watches and warnings so citizens are able to make sound judgments about the appropriate actions to take.

Tornado Watch vs. Warning

  • A tornado watch indicates conditions are favorable for the development of tornadoes in the watch area.
  • A tornado warning indicates that tornadic activity is imminent or already occurring in the warning area.

All severe weather watches and warnings are broadcast to NOAA Weather Radios as well as made available on the National Weather Service’s website.

What should you do?

If you receive notification that a tornado warning has been issued for Tarrant County, take the following actions:

  • Shelter-in-Place. If outdoors, go indoors. If possible, report to the pre-designated shelter-in-place location. If unable to get to the pre-designated shelter-in-place location, take shelter in an interior room away from glass or windows on the lowest floor of the building. Before going to the shelter area, note the time that the warning is set to expire. Remain at the shelter area until the warning expires.
  • Bring a radio. Bring a NOAA Weather Radio or another radio to the shelter area with you so you can monitor weather conditions.

What should you expect?

Campus officials will monitor changing weather conditions in coordination with the National Weather Service office in Fort Worth and will provide updates to the campus community as needed.

 

Where can you find additional information?

For additional information about severe weather and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

Visit the National Weather Service’s severe weather website here.

What Should You Do in the Event of Flooding?

What is flooding?
A flood is an accumulation of water on land as a result of heavy rainfall or utility failure.  Flooding that occurs as a result of a utility failure has the potential to affect operations on campus due to damage to facilities or workspaces.  Heavy rainfall can also cause flooding by inundating rivers and streams as well as overwhelming the capability of storm water sewage systems to remove water from streets and highways.

In advance of approaching storms, the National Weather Service issues flash flood watches and warnings so citizens are able to make sound judgments about the appropriate actions to take.

Flash Flood Watch vs. Warning

  • A flash flood watch indicates conditions are favorable for flash flooding to occur in the area.
  • A flash flood warning indicates flash flooding is imminent or already occurring in the area.

What should you do?
If you encounter flooding in a campus facility, take the following actions:

  • Report incidents.  Report all instances of flooding in campus facilities to the TKU Operations Department.
  • Protect equipment and documents.  If flooding appears likely to affect your work area, take steps to ensure that equipment and important documents are not damaged.
  • Avoid areas of standing water.  Flooding can cause damage to electrical systems, potentially resulting in dangerous currents of electricity moving through water.

If you encounter flooding on roadways, take the following actions:

  • Slow down.  Hydroplaning is a loss of steering or braking control due to a layer of water that prevents direct contact between vehicle tires and the road surface.  Slow down on wet roads to prevent your vehicle from hydroplaning.
  • Turn around, don’t drown.  Do not overestimate your vehicle’s ability to drive through floodwater.  One foot of water will float most cars, and two feet of moving water will sweep away most vehicles.

What should you expect?
Campus officials will monitor changing weather conditions in coordination with the National Weather Service office in Fort Worth and will provide updates to the campus community as needed.

Where can you find additional information?
For additional information about severe weather and to learn what  you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • Visit the National Weather Service’s severe weather website here.
What Should You Do in the Event of Winter Storms?

What are winter storms?
Winter storms typically occur between the months of October and March and bring extremely cold temperatures and precipitation to the region.  This combination of cold weather and wet conditions often causes snow and ice accumulations and can result in:

  • Slick roads and slick sidewalks
  • Downed power lines
  • Road closures

What should you do?
Take the following actions to prepare for winter storms:

  • Dress appropriately.  Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing.  Remember to provide adequate protection for your head, neck, hands, and feet as these are the areas where heat most easily escapes your body.
  • Winterize your home.  When temperatures drop below 32 degrees, the water inside plumbing fixtures may freeze.  Water expands as it freezes, which causes pipes to burst.  You can help prevent this from occurring by leaving the water running at a slow trickle and insulating all external or exposed water piping when pipes are cold enough to freeze.
  • Winterize your car.  Check windshield wiper blades and replace them promptly when worn out.  Ensure fluid levels are at the appropriate levels.  Make sure all lights are working.  Have your brakes checked.  Check that your tires are appropriate for winter conditions and inflated to the appropriate level.
  • Avoid driving if possible.  Drive only when necessary.  Remember: Most North Texans do not have experience driving in icy conditions.  If you must drive, travel during daylight hours if possible, and stay on heavily traveled roads where the constant flow of traffic will help keep ice and snow from accumulating.

What should you expect?
Campus officials will monitor changing weather conditions in coordination with the National Weather Service office in Fort Worth and will provide updates to the campus community as needed.

Where can you find additional information?
For additional information about winter storms and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • Visit the National Weather Service’s winter weather safety and awareness website here.
  • Read the winter weather guide developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration here.
  • Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention winter weather webpage here.
What Should You Do in the Event of an Earthquake?

What is an earthquake?
An earthquake (also known as a quake, tremor or temblor) is the result of a sudden release of energy in the Earth’s crust that creates seismic waves. The seismicity, seismism or seismic activity of an area refers to the frequency, type and size of earthquakes experienced over a period of time.

What should you do?
During an earthquake, stay away from heavy furniture, appliances, large panes of glass or windows, shelves holding heavy objects, and masonry veneer (fire place). These items tend to fall or break and can injure you.

Drop to the floor (to prevent falling), make yourself as small a target as possible, and protecting your head, neck and chest by taking cover under a sturdy desk or table or near an interior wall, covering your head with your hands and arms.

After the earthquake, you will need to stay in the position until you are told to move by a staff or faculty member.  Then you will carefully make your way outside to a designated area.

What should you expect?
Once outside the building, everyone will be accounted for and an assessment of any injuries will be made.

The Director of Operations will meet with other members Emergency Management Team to determine the next course of action.   They will assess the integrity of the building.  They will communicate through the Safety Support Services Team what the safest plan of action for each individual will be.

Where can you find more information?

Visit the Stanford University Preparedness Guide website here.

What Should You Do If You Receive a Bomb Threat?

What is a bomb threat?
A bomb threat is a warning, usually verbal or written, to detonate an explosive or incendiary device to cause property damage, death, or injuries.  Bomb threats can be received by phone, note, or email; however, phone threats are most common.  All bomb threats are to be taken seriously.  It is best to let emergency response personnel determine the validity of any threat by conducting a thorough investigation.

What should you do?
If you receive a bomb threat, take the following actions:

  • Take notes.  If the threat is received by phone, keep the caller on the phone for as long as possible, taking note of any details the caller provides about the bomb, characteristics of the caller’s voice and speech, and identifying background sounds.
  • Check Caller ID
  • Call 911.  Report the threat to law enforcement authorities.  Provide the police dispatcher with all of the information you took note of when interacting with the caller.
  • Evacuate the facility upon hearing the alarm or by an official announcement and follow the TKU Emergency Management Plan.
  • Use designated corridors and exit stairs that lead to ground level.
  • Leave the building in an orderly manner.
  • Do not use elevators.
  • Assemble in designated areas per the TKU Emergency Plan.
  • Follow instructions of fire personnel and other first responders.
  • Upon reaching the ground level, stay at least 300 feet (1block) from the building.
  • Report to emergency responders any individuals left in the building.
  • Do not re-enter the building until an “All Clear” is given by emergency officials.

At no time should you

  • Delete any emails that contain a bomb threat
  • Use a two-way radio or cell phone as radio signals emitted by these devices can detonate a bomb
  • Activate any fire or burglary alarm system

What should you expect?
Emergency response personnel will arrive on scene and that will include Southlake PD.  The first responders to arrive on the scene will evaluate the situation to determine the validity of the threat.  If the threat is found to be real, response personnel will neutralize it.

What Should You Do if You Receive a Suspicious Letter or Package?

What is a suspicious letter or package?
A suspicious letter or package is a piece of mail which may contain a written threat of violence or a harmful substance such as an explosive, radiological, biological, or chemical substance.  Suspicious letters and packages are often identifiable by any of the following traits:

  • No return address
  • Handwritten or poorly typed address
  • Excessive postage
  • Misspelled words
  • Strange stains, odor
  • Foreign postage
  • Marked with restrictions, as “Personal,” “Confidential,” or “Do Not X-Ray”
  • Addressed to no specific person
  • Powdery substance felt through

Suspicious letters and packages may pose a threat to the health and safety of the recipient as well as people in the vicinity and should therefore be handled with caution.

What should you do?
If you receive a suspicious letter or package, take the following actions:

  • Call 911.  Report threat to law enforcement authorities.  Be prepared to provide a description of the suspicious letter or package.
  • Handle with care.  Do not open, smell, or taste the item.  Avoid shaking or bumping the letter or package.  Isolate the item away from yourself and others.
  • Wash hands.  If the package is already open and you have identified the substance as being radiological, biological, or chemical, you should wash your hands with soap and water immediately.
  • Evacuate the facility upon hearing the alarm or by an official announcement and follow the TKU Emergency Plan.
  • Use designated corridors and fire exit stairs that lead to ground level.
  • Leave the building in an orderly manner.
  • Assemble in designated areas per the TKU Emergency Plan.
  • Follow instructions of fire and other first responders.
  • Report to emergency responders any individuals left in the building.
  • Do not re-enter the building until an “All Clear” is given by emergency officials.

What should you expect?
Emergency response personnel will arrive on the scene.  The first responders to arrive on the scene will evaluate the letter or package to determine the validity of the threat.  If the threat is found to be real, response personnel will neutralize it.

Where can you find additional information?
For additional information about suspicious letters and packages and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • View, print, and post in your office the US Postal Service’s advisory poster for suspicious letters or packages available here.
What Should You Do in the Event of a Hazardous Material Spill?

What is a hazardous material spill?
A hazardous material is any item or agent (biological, chemical, physical) which has the potential to cause harm to humans, animals, or the environment, either by itself or through interaction with other factors.  Hazardous materials are used daily on campus and are an integral part of many important university functions.  Additionally, a wide variety of hazardous materials are transported through Southlake via trucks.

What should you do?
Depending on the type and location of a spill, emergency response personnel may direct you to evacuate or shelter-in-place.

If a hazardous materials spill occurs inside your building, take the following actions:

  • Secure the spill area.  If you can safely do so, attempt to isolate the spill by barricading the spill area to prevent other employees from entering the area.
  • Evacuate the facility upon hearing the alarm or by an official announcement and follow the TKU Emergency Management Plan.
  • Use designated corridors and fire exit stairs that lead to ground level.
  • Leave the building in an orderly manner.
  • Do not use elevators.
  • Assemble in designated areas per the TKU Emergency Plan.
  • Follow instructions of fire and other first responders.
  • Upon reaching the ground level, stay at least 300 feet (1block) from the building.
  • Report to emergency responders any individuals left in the building.
  • Do not re-enter the building until an “All Clear” is given by emergency officials.

If a hazardous materials spill has occurred somewhere outside your building, take the following actions:

  • Go indoors.  If instructed by emergency response personnel go to or remain inside the nearest building to avoid inhaling toxic fumes.
  • Stay in an enclosed area.  Avoid windows and areas with glass.  Call TKU Operations Department and request that the Heat or A/C be turned off to avoid drawing in outside air.

What should you expect?
Once notified of the situation, emergency response personnel will begin arriving on scene.  For large spills, Southlake Police Department will assess the situation and set up a perimeter around the facility if necessary.  The Southlake Fire Department and/or Risk Management Services will coordinate clean-up of the spill.

Where can you find additional information?
For additional information about hazardous materials spills and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following action:

Visit the Hazardous Materials section on the FEMA website here.

What Should You Do in the Event of a Food-borne Illness or Communicable Disease Outbreak?

What is a food-borne illness or communicable disease outbreak?
Communicable diseases are diseases transmitted through contact with contaminated people, animals, or surfaces that have the potential to spread quickly through the community.  Examples include H1N1 and Tuberculosis.  Similarly, food-borne illnesses can spread quickly through a population but result from the consumption of contaminated foods.  Examples of food-borne illness include Salmonella and Hepatitis A.  Exposure to both food-borne illnesses and communicable diseases can cause a variety of symptoms and can even result in death.

What should you do?
In the event that a communicable disease or food-borne illness is circulating throughout the community, please take the following preventative actions:

  • Get the facts.  Learn the signs, symptoms, and preventative actions for the disease or illness outbreak.
  • Practice good hygiene.  Wash your hands often.  Cover your mouth when you cough.  Use hand sanitizer.  Clean and sanitize surfaces regularly.
  • Stay home when you are sick.  Do not go to work or class when you are sick; you run the risk of infecting those around you.  Additionally, staying home will enable you to get needed rest so you can more quickly return to good health.
  • Seek medical attention.  If you begin to experience the signs and symptoms associated with an identified outbreak contagion, visit your physician in order to receive he prescribed care for the health condition.

What should you expect?
The TKU Health Crisis Team meets in response to reports of a health crisis or disease that has the potential to affect the campus community.  Their efforts are focused on gathering information on the situation, managing the dissemination of information to the community, and determining the appropriate prophylactic actions to take.  The TKU Health Crisis Team coordinates closely with the Tarrant County Health Department on public health matters.

Where can you find additional information?
For additional information about communicable diseases and food-borne illnesses and to learn what you can do to ensure your safety and that of those around you, please take the following actions:

  • Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website here.
  • Visit the Texas Department of State Health Services website here.
What Should You Do in the Event of a Blood Pathogen Emergency?

What is a blood-borne pathogen?
Blood-borne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries may expose workers to blood-borne pathogens. Workers in many occupations, including first aid team members, housekeeping personnel in some industries, nurses and other healthcare personnel may be at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens.

What can be done to control exposure to blood-borne pathogens?
In order to reduce or eliminate the hazards of occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens, TKU will implement an exposure control plan for the university with details on student and faculty protection measures. The plan will describe how TKU will use a combination of engineering and work practice controls, ensure the use of personal protective clothing and equipment, provide training, and signs and labels, among other provisions.

Where you can find additional information?
For addition information about blood-borne pathogens and learn what you can do to ensure your safety please take the following actions:

  • Visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website here.